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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
is a big part of the reason why. before i served in congress, i ran a small business in ohio. i was amazed at;h$ow different washington, d.c. operated than every other business in america, where most american businesses make the hard choices of paying their bills and living within their means, in washington, more spending and more debt is business as usual. i've got news for washington, those days are over. president obama came to congress in january and requested business as usual. he had another routine increase in the national debt, but we in the house said not so fast. he was a president asking for the largest debt increase in history on the heels of the largest spending increase in history. here's what we got from that massive spending binge, a new health care bill most americans didn't ask for, a new spending bill that's more useful for producing material for late night comedians than jobs, and a debt that sparked a crisis without precedent in my lifetime or yours. the united states cannot default on its debt limitations. what we told the president in january was this, the american
and boehner plans, the big difference is the boehner plan forces us to raise the debç ceiling again and forces us to accept a $1.8 trillion or more in cuts from the so-called super commission, and if we don't do it, we go through another crises. he also demands a vote on the budget amendment. i think you could get something more rational to incentivize another plan down the road and have something with enough pressure coming from the markets, both parties could vote for. >> you make it sound like if reasonable people had a conversation about this there might actually be a solution, so thanks for being on and talking with us today. >> glad to be here. >> that was ezra klein, columnist for "the washington post" and bloomberg and also an msnbc policy analyst. thanks so much. >> thank you. >> now, ask yourself, would you -- no, not you, nancy. would you want john boehner's job right now, trying to placate a gaggle of angry tea partiers and stave off an economic calamity at the same time? i suspect there are moments even he doesn't want this job, but he's got it, and we need john boehner to get bet
of answers to that. first of all, the size of the debt, the national debt, has grown. it really is big right now, almost as large as the whole economy itself and it hasn't been that way since the end of world war ii. people have been increasingly attempted to use the debt ceiling vote as a political weapon. the democrats did that a few years ago. as a matter of fact, barack obama, when he was a senator, not president, voted against an increase in the debt ceiling for political reasons himself. but when the tea party arrived, they use this vote as an excuse for a kind of building takeover. i'm of the '60s generation, this feels to me like occupying the administration building, okay? that's who the tea party people are. they want to stop the system with a capital "s." they think they are doing the lord's work, literally, in doing so, and that's the problem john boehner had in dealing with them. he didn't have money to give them, instead of giving them pork, because there are no ear marks, he gave them constitutional pork in the form of this vote on the constitutional amendment to balance the b
default, it won't be a big deal. now, john boehner doesn't believe that, mitch mcconnell doesn't believe that, but boehnor seems unable to move toward any kind of agreement, partly because he's worried about his own fate in this caucus or he's worried that if he puts together a deal that is supported by too many democrats and not enough republicans, he's also threatened. so i think it's that internal politics in the republican caucus that's blocking this. i think what might happen is that mitch mcconnell may decide to let harry reid pass his plan without threatening a filibuster. now, if he did that, the democrats could get it through with a majority. that's how most democracies do things, but not our senate, and that may set up grounds for a solution. that's about the only thing i could see right now that might begin to get us out of this or at least begin real negotiations again. >> so, speaking of that, of the idea there is, in fact, a majority rule, and that there's so much politics going on here, look, we saw this reuters poll indicating a majority of voters favor president obama's
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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